SAKKARRA CHINESE CRESTEDS

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Sakkarra Black is the New Black! Gorilla

Posted by showcresties on March 23, 2012 at 5:25 PM Comments comments (0)


Chinese Crested Grooming video for Hairless Video Pure Paws

Posted by showcresties on March 23, 2012 at 5:10 PM Comments comments (0)

My fave Chinese Crested Grooming video for Hairless

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfRpP4rHGbc&feature=related

The Pure Paws Products are amazing!

Dyann Callahan Sakkarra Afghan Hounds and Chinese Cresteds

ACCC Meet the Breed surprize

Posted by showcresties on March 23, 2012 at 4:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Just spied GinGin as an ambassador for our breed- she is awesome!! GinGin(Sakkarra N Jewels Giot Chocolate?) is in Jon arms in the pic- chocolate girl fo course!

It makes me happy to see she is used for this job of introducing the breed!

http://accc.chinesecrestedclub.info/pages/Club_Events.html

 

"On October 16 & 17, the ACCC participated in the AKC Meet the Breeds event in New York City. With a well done Chinese theme our breed was well represented by Julie & Jon Wells, Barbara & Bill Garrett, Pat Bickerstaffe, Anthony Lujack, Merey Garrett and all their dogs. According the Julie a good time was had by all and they were all worn out at the end of the weekend. Thanks to Julie, her helpers and their dogs. "


 

Dyann Callahan Sakkarra Chinese Cresteds

Chinese Crested Breed Standard Videos part 1

Posted by showcresties on March 23, 2012 at 4:45 PM Comments comments (0)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKuOabwsgEM

Chinese Crested Breed Standard [Part 1 of 5]

Sakkarra Chinese Cresteds Dyann Callahan & Eric Eichenberger Shepherdsville,KY

ACCC Illustrated Guide to the Chinese Crested

Posted by showcresties on March 23, 2012 at 4:30 PM Comments comments (0)

http://accc.chinesecrestedclub.info/

The parent site has a great illustrated guide to the Chinese Crested

ACCC Illustrated Guide to the Chinese Crested

 

Sakkarra Chinese Cresteds Dyann Callahan KY

Sakkarra Nothing But the Radio On is now a National Champion!

Posted by showcresties on October 25, 2011 at 7:30 PM Comments comments (0)

Sakkarra Nothing But the Radio On is now a National Champion!

http://www.chinesecrested.no/no/registry/104243/Sakkarra+Nothing+But+the+Radio+On+.html

Mocha's first Champion!

 

WHAT EVERY OWNER MUST KNOW- PARVO & COCCIDIA

Posted by showcresties on March 7, 2011 at 7:48 PM Comments comments (0)

Usually, sadly, people have advice when they have experienced things. Thats why I try to write in this blog for fellow dog lovers.

PARVO & COCCIDIA

With traveling and even everyday trips to Feeders supply or the gas station...you can pick up horrible diseases and bring them home. A stray can bring them in your yard, or a trip to the grocery can be devastating.

So please arm yourself with precautions that cost pennies but can save thousands in vet bills or your dogs life.

This page is about prevention. There are many articles on the actual diseases etc.

~~BLEACH SPRAY- 1/3 CUP TO 1 GALLON WATER.

~BLEACH KILLS PARVO!

~BLEACH DOES NOT KILL COCCIDIA 

~ONLY AMMONIA DOES!!! *****DO NOT MIX TOGETHER*****

~~WE WENT THROUGH A HORRIBLE TIME WHEN WE BLEACHED AFTER SHOWS AND THOUGHT WE WERE PROTECTED.

After a few thousand in vet bills and IV's and prayers, we were told this.

WE KEEP BOTTLES BY THE DOOR OF 1 PART AMMONIA/2 PARTS WATER AND SPRAY THE PORCH/WALKWAY WHEN WE LEAVE AND WALK OURSELVES AND THE DOGS THROUGH IT  WHEN WE COME HOME FROM THE PARK. WE ALSO SPRAY, OR ESPECIALLY SPRAY SHALL I SAY, WHEN WE HAVE COMPANY THAT HAVE DOGS OR HAVE BEEN TRAVELING.

Coccidia mimics parvo in white gums,vomiting, lethargy and horrible diarreah. It is puddle of black dark waste and after the stomach is stripped bright red blood puddles EVERY FEW HOURS. As you can imagine, its heartbreaking. Kaopectate, glucose tablets and honey every hour help the dog stay out of shock and coat the stomach as it takes about 3 days to start to pass. Hydration is a must.

I am in tears writing this as we almost lost Prissy after Xmas last year. Our nephew is a driver and has a dog that travels with him who is 120 lbs. Prissy is 4. She lost 1/4 her body weight and half her hair. meanwhile we are bleaching away and a second bought hit a week later. We werent killing it.  THIS IS WHY WE DONT USE REST STOPS/DOG WALKS WITHOUT PRECAUTIONS OR ANYWHERE STRAYS OR "DOG TRAFFIC" IS. SHOW DOGS TRAVEL ALOT AND ARE EXPOSED TO A LOT.

I hope no one ever has to go through either one.

Dyann

 

 

BELOW SOME INFO FOR RESEARCH:

Parvo used to be a life sentance. Now it sometimes has survivors if caught early.  http://dogparvosymptoms.net/

Puppies and small dogs show symptoms quickly.

■Lethargic. If your dog normally likes to play and has high energy, this is the clearest sign that something is wrong. You could say they act depressed. They look up like they dont understand whats wrong and seem worried, balled up.

■Lack of Appetite. The more common strains attack the digestive system.

■Vomiting with no change in diet. It usually looks clear and foamy. dry heaves and wretching

■Bloody Diarrhea.

■Stronger Feces Odor. It’s unmistakable and you will never forget it. Liver colored and horrible wet pudding.

 

http://www.vetinfo.com/coccidia-dogs-explained.html

 

Hairless Grooming and Clipping puff talk

Posted by showcresties on February 12, 2011 at 3:49 PM Comments comments (0)

I WAS ASKED CAN YOU JUST CLIP A PUFF? A hhl, or hairy hairless gets hair up the legs and a strip down the back. They do get pretty flowing furnishings. You can clip a puff, but the undercoat is very silky and leaves a "sheen" and within 3 days the soft coat is back. A HHL doesnt have the undercoat and the hair is pretty harsh and you can see through it.

here is the best site about grooming, at the top you can see the 3 types. The HHL gets the longest flowing manes and tails so they are more competivite and popular.

Puffs will not get big foot hair or big crests/tails. Its almost the opposite of a hairless.

http://www.crestars.com/chinese_crested_grooming_hairless.html

 

I WONT LIE, SOME OF THE EXTREME "HHL" TAKE MORE TIME THAN A PUFF TO READY FOR A SHOW!

 With the longer flowing furnishings, manes and tails and the 'glamour'...they win more so are bred more. Show people have almost introduced a new type. for a pet no one wants to spend up to 3-4 hours weekly making their "hairless" dog hairless. Most have some grooming to do, but be sure to ask. And be prepared that the ones with big poofy feet and long manes will have some body hair. If even a strip down the back. A TRUE hairless has a mohawk and very very little hair on its feet and tail. Thicker skin and sometimes a "B.O." body odor if not bathed like a person will accompany that, and thats when you get into sunscreens and lotions.

A puff has more hair follicles and very soft skin, so if shaved you can tell by the hair dispersal and when you lift up the mane their is a "cut line" even if dilapitories are used, there will be a line that a hairless dog will not have. A hairless mane has bigger follicles and no undercoat there.

Essential Spice for Dogs AND Humans!

Posted by showcresties on February 8, 2011 at 12:35 AM Comments comments (0)

Of all the items in my pantry, the one I never want to run out of is cinnamon. My dogs and I enjoy this amazing, deliciously fragrant spice every single day of the year. The dogs get cinnamon sprinkled over their food at every meal; I like it in and on everything from yogurt, lemonade, and chai tea to vegetable curry, baked apples, and rice pudding.

Not only does cinnamon smell and taste great, it has many health benefits, as we’ll see below.

But first, what is it and where does it come from? Cinnamon is a small tree that grows in India, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Brazil, Vietnam, and Egypt; its bark is dried and rolled into cinnamon sticks (also called quills), then ground into powder.

There are four varieties, but Ceylon cinnamon (its Latin name is Cinnamomum verum) and Cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) are the most popular; Ceylon, also called true cinnamon, is sweeter, lighter in color, and more expensive than Cassia, which is the darker type of cinnamon more commonly found in supermarkets and Starbucks. Whichever variety you choose, it’s definitely worth it to spend a bit more on organic cinnamon, which tends to be even more wonderfully fragrant than its non-organic counterpart.

Traditionally, cinammon has been used around the world to remedy flatulence, nausea, diarrhea, and painful menstrual periods. It’s also believed to boost energy, vitality, circulation, cognitive function and overall brain health, and to improve the digestion of dairy products.

In one study, sniffing cinnamon was shown to result in improved brain function – test subjects performed better at memory and attention after a whiff of this spectacular spice. So if you’re working with your dog on learning new tricks, definitely offer him or her a sniff of cinnamon before you begin your training session!

Recent studies have shown that just half a teaspoon of cinnamon a day helps to regulate blood sugar and raise insulin resistance; it actually boosts the body’s ability to use insulin to improve blood glucose levels. This is vital for anyone at risk for Diabetes – and that includes senior and overweight dogs. So in addition to feeding a low glycemic index dog food, top his kibble bowl off with cinnamon! Other studies reveal that cinnamon is antifungal; it works to combat Candida albicans, the fungus that causes yeast infections. These infections are often resistant to medication, but not to cinnamon. (Dogs who suffer from allergies are often prone to yeast infections).

Cinnamon is also antibacterial, and slows down the spoilage of food. When I have to store part of a can of dog food overnight, I’ll sprinkle half a teaspoon of cinnamon over it before refrigerating (on a side note, never refrigerate dog food in the can – to preserve palatability, spoon it into a glass storage container with a plastic top). Researchers at Kansas State University found that cinnamon even prevents the growth of E. Coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices! So for safety’s sake, be sure to add some cinnamon to your raw apple cider.

An anti-inflammatory, cinnamon is great for senior dogs struggling with arthritis. With my K9 seniors, I’ve had great results mixing a half-teaspoon of cinnamon with a tablespoon of honey. This is the recipe used by researchers at Copenhagen University, where arthritis patients were able to walk without pain after just a week of taking cinnamon with honey every day. Yet more studies show that cinnamon can lower blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, and slow the growth of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells.

Here’s a caveat: Cassia cinnamon (the darker, more common type) contains a compound called coumarin, which can damage the liver at high levels. One more reason to use Ceylon cinnamon instead! But Cassia cinnamon is safe as long as you don’t overdo it; a teaspoon or so every day with food will still be beneficial in all the ways described above, but won’t give you or your dog nearly as high a dose as the higher concentration found in, say, a cinnamon supplement capsule (which would contain a substantially higher amount of coumarin).

Also, cinnamon has a mild anti-clotting effect on the blood, so too much can cause bleeding problems if a person is on blood-thinning medication such as aspirin. And pregnant women (or dogs) should not take too much cinnamon, as it may have a stimulating effect on the uterus.

But in small amounts – half a teaspoon at every meal – cinnamon obviously does a lot more good than harm. Enjoy!


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